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20121101
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u.s. president to visit there. while in cambodia, the president is going to be meeting with a leaders at a dinner of the asian summit. and yesterday he made a historic meeting in myanmar where he met with parliament elected leader aun san suu kyi. >> this is not an endorsement of the burmese government, but it is an acknowledgment that there is a process under way inside of that country that even a year and a half, two years ago, nobody foresaw. >> meanwhile back home in washington, congress is off for a week for the thanksgiving holiday, lawmakers are vowing to get to the bottom of intelligence questions in the immediate wake of the deadly attack of a u.s. consulate in libya, including whether ambassador susan rice's so-called talking points were altared the weekend after she gave that announcem of the attack. >> she didn't know anything about the attack in benghazi and the most politically compliant person. i don't know what she knew, but i know that the story she told was misleading. >> the debate on the hill intensified by general david petraeus' testimony friday th
condemning the bus bombing, going on record saying that the u.s. will stand with its israeli allies. joining me from cairo, nbc news correspondent jim maceda. jim, explain to all of us the reaction to secretary clinton's visit to the region and the impact that her presence has brought to the negotiations for a cease-fire. >> reporter: first, the reaction has been one of anxiety, anticipation, and of deep hope that secretary of state hillary clinton can now broker or help to broke err deal. they certainly don't want war right next door. many are asking where america has been for these past eight or so years. i think the overall feeling is one of anticipation, that something hopefully now can move forward. in terms of her impact today, she's met already with president morsi. she's also wrapping up a meeting with the foreign minister and we understand at the press conference she's supposed to give has not started yet. but i can guarantee you that many people here in egypt and israel are intent on following that press conference. unlike yesterday, there have been no dramatic statements that a ce
impact on his testimony? he said no. >> but the focus of the hearing was the deadly attack of the u.s. consulate in benghazi and congressman dutch ruppersberger saying the former cia director made it clear there was terrorist involvement. >> he reinforced the fact that initially, the first 24 hours, he felt at that point or the cia felt at that point that this was a protest as a result of what happened with the film with egypt. he clarified that after more information came in, there was not a protest. >> general petraeus' testimony comes today the morning after cia acting director michael morell and james clapper the director of national int intelligence went before members of congress in two other hearings and hours after attorney general eric holder defended the decision not to bring members of congress into the loop sooner. >> we follow the facts. we do not share outside the justice department, outside the fbi the facts of ongoing investigations. we made the determination as we were going through the matter that there was not a threat to national security. >> let's jump right in an
, this was an all-important test of u.s.-egyptians relations following the arab spring. what's the grade? >> well, the grade is good. better than good. you have to be cautious, of course. you're talking about the middle east. but i think that it's remarkable, alex, really, to see the kind of praise that president morsi is receiving. even in those defiant speeches that ayman was referring to, hamas leaders, islamic jihad leaders, benjamin netanyahu's comments last night, secretary clinton's comments last night, president obama's praise, everybody has good things to say about morsi, who has now emerged not only as a can-do politician, but a power broker in the region. for instance, when the truce deal needed to be closed and clinton came to cairo, she spent hours with morsi and with his foreign minister, mohammed kamul, finding the compromise that israel and hamas could live with. mainly stop the hostilities today and negotiate the other demands later. alex? >> jim, thank you very much for that live report from cairo with the latest on the brokering of the truce. joining me now, former u.s. ambassa
are watching some major developments at the u.s. supreme court where the nine justices are behind closed doors considering whether to take up cases that will impact same-sex marriage in america. ten marriage equality cases are on the high court's menu. eight of them deal with the federal defense of marriage act, or doma. joining me now is chris geidner. the man who knows the supreme court inside and out, pete williams. pete, good to have you with us. break it down. which cases are we talking about, and how quickly might we find out whether they will move forward? >> reporter: well, if they're going to take any of these cases, thomas, it's very likely we'll find out this afternoon. and i think the most likely event here is that they will grant one of the cases that challenges the federal defense of marriage act. passed in 1966 by congress signed by president clinton, it defines marriage as for federal law purposes as only the legal union of one man and one woman. now, the practical effect of that is that in the nine states that now grant or soon will grant same-sex couples the legal right to ge
, we're talking about what the u.s. gives, $2 billion annually, the imf has $4.8 billion in the reserve fund to help egypt and senator lindsey graham over the weekend was very forceful saying we are watching you. they know full well that aid will be cut off if they don't act accordingly trying to broker a peace deal, correct? >> i would say it's more than just trying to broker a peace deal. i think it's fulfilling its obligations. in the first sense its international obligations. one thing the president morsi understood is if hamas continued to do what it was doing and if the pressures on him led to him breaking the peace treaty with israel, then it wasn't just american assistance that would be put at risk. it would be all the assistance internationally. all the investment egypt would need. so he's putting egypt's needs first and foremost and that suggests that actually the economic imperfect it tiff is trumping the ideological imperatives and that's actually a positive sign for the future. >> with hillary clinton going to the region and with these positive signs that morsi has already
and the police, that took place outside the u.s. embassy. riot police there fired tear gas and rubber bullets to try to keep the crowds at bay. one of the central issues of the protesters behind me is that since the end of the revolution, egypt's police force has not been reformed. many of the senior officers are still in positions of power that has led to them continuing many of the brutal tactics that they used under the mubarak era. and today, the people behind me have gathered demanding a few important changes. one, they want president morsi to rescind the decree that he issued on thursday that gave him absolute powers, but more importantly, they want egypt's constitutional assembly. they want writing a new constitution to be more inclusive and reflect egypt's pluralistic viewpoints. the people behind me are the opposition. they have been dormant, haven't been unified. today, many of egypt's more powerful, secular liberal opposition forces have united for the first time. these numbers are unprecedented for them. and i think they are sending from what they're telling me, at least, they're
for a global perspective is former united states senator george mitchell who served as the u.s. special envoy for middle east peace from 2009 to 2011. sir, welcome. we are awfully glad to have you here. let's talk about egyptian president mohammed morsi who played the critical role. he is facing protests in his own country because he's trying to expand and have further reaching powers. do you see this as a power grab? that he's riding on something of a success? >> churchill once said democracy is the worst possible form of government except for anything else that's been tried by human beings. as senate majority leader, faced with constant delay, frustration, filibustering, i often thought, boy, i would like to be king for a day and cut through all of this. democracy is tough. it's messy and morsi is finding that out. i don't think that what he did was right, and i don't think it will hold. >> with regard to what he's doing now by ordering some retrials in terms of hosni mubarak and his cabinet, what might that do to the situation there? do you worry that would have inflaming factions there? >
Search Results 0 to 8 of about 9 (some duplicates have been removed)

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